‘American Revolution Museum at Yorktown’ Artifacts
Showcased in Jamestown Settlement Exhibition  

eagle-pommel saber

This sword scabbard is inscribed with the year 1776 and the name of its owner, William McKissack, a Continental Army officer from New York. The silver pommel is in the form of an eagle, which over the course of the Revolution became one of the symbols of the new United States.

An American-made eagle-pommel sword dating to 1776 is one of 60-some objects destined for exhibit at the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown now on display at Jamestown Settlement history museum in “Jamestown’s Legacy to the American Revolution.”  The special exhibition, which opened March 1 and continues through January 20, 2014, examines the lives of Revolutionary War-era descendants of people associated with 17th-century Jamestown, the first capital of colonial Virginia, using the artifacts to illustrate their stories.

Work is under way on the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown, which will replace the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown by late 2016 with expanded exhibition galleries and outdoor living-history areas offering a renewed perspective on the entire Revolutionary period, from the beginnings of colonial unrest to the early years of the new nation.  The artifacts featured in “Jamestown’s Legacy to the American Revolution” – a sampling of those to be exhibited in the new museum – include furnishings, weapons, nautical items, documents and commemorative objects.  Among them are the eagle-pommel sword, a trunk that belonged to a shipbuilder for the Continental Navy, an official portrait of King George III in coronation robes, and a first edition of the poems of Phillis Wheatley, the famous African-American poet.

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